Tree Damage and Their Sufferings

This Progress Report submitted by Jay Axe, Matt Cottrill, Paula Moran, Neal Rosenthal [e-mail:cottrijm@miamioh.edu] on 11/20/00.

Here is a break down of the progress we have made thus far:

We have updated our data collection chart to this format, making it easier for field data collection.


Tree Number Type of Location Type of Damage
1 Interior Insect
2 Interior Wind
3 Interior Unknown (Bark Damage)
4 Interior Unknown (Missing/Damaged Branches)
5 Interior Unknown (Bark/Branch Damaged, Angled Growth, Fungus Growth)
6 Interior Unknown (Bark Damage)
7 Interior Unknown (Bark Damage, Rotting interior)
8 Interior Insect and Wind
9 Interior Unknown (Bark Damage)
10 Interior Unknown (Bark/ Branch Damage)
11 Interior Unknown (Bark/ Branch Damage)
12 Interior Insect (Branch Damage)
13 Interior Insect (Branch Damage)
14 Interior Unknown (Bare top branches)
15 Interior Unknown (Bare top branches)
16 Interior Unknown (Trunk Damage)
17 Interior Insect/ Fungus
18 Interior Unknown (Trunk/ Bark Damage)
19 Interior Insect
20 Interior Insect
21 Interior Insect (Bark Damage)
22 Exterior Wind
23 Exterior Wind
24 Exterior Wind (Bark/ Branch Damage)
25 Exterior Wind (Bark/ Branch Damage)
26 Exterior Unknown (Branch Damage)
27 Exterior Unknown (Fungus, loss of needles)
28 Exterior Wind (Branch Damage)
29 Exterior Unknown (Broken Branches, Vine around it)
30 Exterior Unknown (Broken Branches, Bark Damage)
31 Exterior Unknown (Slight Bark Loss, Severe Branch Loss)
32 Exterior Wind (Branch Loss)
33 Exterior Wind (Branch Loss)
34 Exterior Severe Insect Damage, then Wind
35 Exterior Insect (Bark Damage)
36 Exterior Wind (Branch Damage)
37 Exterior Wind (Branch Damage)
38 Exterior Insect, then Wind
39 Exterior Wind (Peeling Bark)
40 Exterior Insect

If Wind Damage: If Insect Damage:
Tree Number Broken limbs? Angled growth? Missing bark? Dead/Broken limbs? Insect holes? Missing bark? Additional Comments?
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40


We have decided to continue our data collection, by gather the data for the exterior tress on our own, due to the lack of class time to travel to the trees’ location. We have broken down the data readings for the types of damage into quantitative numbers for analysis. Here are the ways in which the above charts will be filled in:

For Broken/ Missing Limbs:

A 0 to 10 scale will be used.
0-being the least- i.e. no broken limbs
5-being 50% of the branches broken
10-being 100% of the branches broken
Taking an average of the exterior numbers verses an average of the interior numbers, we can get a comparison of limb breakage.

For Missing Bark and Insect Holes:

A 0 to 10 scale will also be employed with 0 being none and 10 being 100% of the tree having insect holes or missing bark.
These numbers will be averaged as well for comparative analysis between the two locations.

For Angled Growth:

A terminology will be used to understand the differences in wind damage in the two locations. Here is that wording system:

Severe - > 45degree from the perpendicular
Moderate- 45degrees to 20degrees from the perpendicular
Slight- 20degrees to 10degrees from the perpendicular
Irrelevant- 10degrees to 0degrees from the perpendicular

The number of each of these terms can be quantified and thereby analyzed to understand the effects of wind damage in each area.

In our chart, we decided to eliminate the distances of other trees to the damaged trees we are investigating. This was decided to be truly irrelevant to our hypothesis and therefore was unnecessary.

Here is a timeline of how our lab will progress over the coming weeks remaining in this semester:

Sun 19th: meet at noon [room TBA]. Plan presentation for class. If still time, go catalog more trees. Work for over the break will be divided up. Persons will be assigned to post the group progress on the web.

Mon 20th: Post progress on web for class.

Tuesday 21st - Sunday 26th: Enjoy the break and time with your families!

Mon 27th: Mandatory meeting for last minute preparations for class the next day.

Tues 28th: Take class out to record tree data.

Wed 29 - Fri 1: analyze data and record findings [exact time of meeting will be determined after schedules are known.

December

Fri 1 - Sun 3: Writing final lab write-up [meeting times and places TBA, pending knowing everyone's schedule]

Mon 4 - Wed 6: This will spent finalizing the lab. Exactly what is to be done and when will be decided on Sunday, December 3.

Thursday December 7th the lab is due!




Here is how our class presentation will work:

Class Presentation

Hypothesis and data collection info on the board:

Of damaged trees, we hypothesize that in the interior of the forest the amount of insect damage will be greater than wind damage, due to tree density and the ability of insects to travel easier between trees. Conversely, on the exterior of the forest the damage will be due more to wind because of the lack of cover and, therefore, have greater exposure to the elements.

For Broken/ Missing Limbs:

A 0 to 10 scale will be used.
0-being the least- i.e. no broken limbs
5-being 50% of the branches broken
10-being 100% of the branches broken
Taking an average of the exterior numbers verses an average of the interior numbers, we can get a comparison of limb breakage.

For Missing Bark and Insect Holes:

A 0 to 10 scale will also be employed with 0 being none and 10 being 100% of the tree having insect holes or missing bark.
These numbers will be averaged as well for comparative analysis between the two locations.

For Angled Growth:

A terminology will be used to understand the differences in wind damage in the two locations. Here is that wording system:

Severe - > 45degree from the perpendicular
Moderate- 45degrees to 20degrees from the perpendicular
Slight- 20degrees to 10degrees from the perpendicular
Irrelevant- 10degrees to 0degrees from the perpendicular

The number of each of these terms can be quantified and thereby analyzed to understand the effects of wind damage in each area.

Four Groups
2 to the interior 2 to the interior



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